Last edited by Kagor
Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

2 edition of Responses of the habituated vestibulo-ocular reflex arc to drug stress found in the catalog.

Responses of the habituated vestibulo-ocular reflex arc to drug stress

Patrick J. Dowd

Responses of the habituated vestibulo-ocular reflex arc to drug stress

by Patrick J. Dowd

  • 280 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by USAF School of Aerospace Medicine, Aerospace Medical Division (AFSC) in Brooks Air Force Base, Tex .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Vestibulo-ocular reflex.,
  • Drugs -- Physiological effect.

  • Edition Notes

    Statement[prepared in the Aeromedical Indoctrination Department by Patrick J. Dowd]
    SeriesTechnical documentary report -- no. SAM-TDR-64-72, Technical documentary report (USAF School of Aerospace Medicine) -- no. SAM-TDR-64-72.
    ContributionsUSAF School of Aerospace Medicine.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiii, 24 p. :
    Number of Pages24
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19258719M

      Abnormal vestibulo-ocular reflex. Summary: An abnormality of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR).The VOR attempts to keep the image stable on the retina. Ideally passive or active head movements in one direction are compensated for by eye movements of equal magnitude. 1, 2 More on Abnormal vestibulo-ocular reflex». Advances in the treatment of eye movement disorders The modern rationale for the treatment of abnormal eye movements rests on current concepts of the neurobiology of ocular motility and vision.1 In order to see clearly the details in our visual world, images must be held quite still upon the retina, especially the central, foveal part, which has the highest density of photoreceptors. In order.

    Horizontal plane optokinetic (OKR) and vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) eye movements were obtained from normal subjects in response to pseudorandom rotational stimulation. Results showed large intersubject variability in OKR responses. Typical OKR responses had approximately constant gain (Mean ) over Hz. Vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), eye movement that functions to stabilize gaze by countering movement of the head. In VOR the semicircular canals of the inner ear measure rotation of the head and provide a signal for the oculomotor nuclei of the brainstem, which innervate the eye muscles counter-rotate the eyes in such a way that a rightward head rotation causes an equal leftward.

      The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is a reflex, where activation of the vestibular system causes eye movement. This reflex functions to stabilize . The ocular motor response of the rotational vestibulo-ocular reflex (rVOR) is characterized by longer time constants, typically between 15 and 20 sec, due to the so-called velocity storage.


Share this book
You might also like
Philosophy, or truth?

Philosophy, or truth?

HVAC duct construction standards

HVAC duct construction standards

The last act

The last act

Star Trek readers reference to the novels, 1988-1989

Star Trek readers reference to the novels, 1988-1989

Sugar

Sugar

Round Trip, Looneyville/Tokyo Bay Via the USS George F. Elliott Lines

Round Trip, Looneyville/Tokyo Bay Via the USS George F. Elliott Lines

memoirs called gospels

memoirs called gospels

MacroRAM HILO generator

MacroRAM HILO generator

National Energy Information Administration Basic Concepts

National Energy Information Administration Basic Concepts

Tearing Down the Gates

Tearing Down the Gates

Corporate restructuring

Corporate restructuring

cereals in America.

cereals in America.

Western Civilization Volume 1 8th Edition Plus Discovering The American Past Volume 1 5th Edition

Western Civilization Volume 1 8th Edition Plus Discovering The American Past Volume 1 5th Edition

Pilot models for single- and multi-loop systems with random forcing functions

Pilot models for single- and multi-loop systems with random forcing functions

Responses of the habituated vestibulo-ocular reflex arc to drug stress by Patrick J. Dowd Download PDF EPUB FB2

Amd tr rep. dec responses of the habituated vestibulo-ocular reflex arc to drug stress. sam-tdr dowd pj. pmid: Author: Dowd Pj. The mammalian orienting response to sounds consists of a gaze shift that can be a combination of head and eye movements.

In animals with mobile pinnae, the ears also move. During head movements, vision is stabilized by compensatory rotations of the eyeball within the head because of the vestibulo-ocular reflex Cited by: Dowd, P.J.: Responses of the habituated vestibulo-ocular reflex arc to drug stress.

USAF SAM-TDR–72, Brooks AFB, Texas, USAF SAM-TDR Cited by: Adaptive Properties of the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex; that the drug dosages in this book are correct. Readers must therefore always check the product information and clinical procedures with the most up to date published product information and data sheets provided by the manufacturers and the most recent codes of conduct and safety.

In experimentally naive monkeys the horizontal vestibulo-ocular-reflex (VOR) has a time constant which is in the range of 40–60 s. It can be measured as the nystagmus decline after pulses of angular acceleration, or from the transfer functions obtained from sinusoidal rotation with different frequencies.

When frequencies below Hz are applied, sinusoidal rotation leads to a pronounced Cited by:   Vestibulo-ocular responses in darkness reflect some (labile) default status of a complex spatial localization system, not the status of a hard-wired VOR. CohenThe Vestibulo-ocular reflex arc. Autrum, et al.

(Eds.), Handbook of Sensory Physiology, Springer. Two sets of experiments have examined the vestibulo‐ocular response (VOR) to repeated sinusoidal rotation (A) in the dark and (B) after attempting visual tracking of a mirror‐reversed image of the visual surround In both A and B a horizontal sinusoidal rotational stimulus of 1/6 Hz and 60°/sec angular velocity amplitude was employed, specifically chosen to lie within the presumed.

Dowd PJ: Responses of the habituated vestibule-ocular reflex arc to drug stress. School Aerospace Medicine Technical Data Report No,pp Crampton GH: Habituation of vestibular nystagmus in the cat during sustained arousal produced by D- amphetamine.

The vestibulo–ocular reflex, commonly termed the VOR, evokes eye movements in the direction opposite to head movement, thus serving to stabilize vision automatically relative to space. Aroundthe VOR attracted the attention of anatomists and physiologists (including Magnus [1], Lorente de No [2] and Szentágothai [3]) as a simple.

Kristal M. Riska AuD, PhD, Owen D. Murnane PhD, in Dizziness and Vertigo Across the Lifespan, Video Head Impulse Test and Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Gain.

vHIT VOR gain is usually quantified as either position gain or velocity gain that is measured over a wide response interval or over limited time intervals usually associated with peak head velocity or peak head acceleration.

The cerebellum is involved in motor learning, and adaptations of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and optokinetic response (OKR) have been studied as models of motor learning 1,2,3, and OKR.

Thomas P. Bleck, in Textbook of Clinical Neurology (Third Edition), PUPILLARY RESPONSES TO LIGHT. The parasympathetic reflex arc begins in the retina, traverses the base of the brain, runs through the midbrain, and returns to the pupil (see Chapters 8 and 9 Chapter 8 Chapter 9).Disorders altering pupillary constriction typically affect the midbrain or cranial nerve III.

Abstract. In humans, habituation of vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) by repeated caloric or rotational stimulation has been well documented. However, less attention has been directed to the effect of habituation on the sensation of self-rotation and little is known about the.

Dizziness and vertigo are some of the more frequently encountered symptoms in neurology clinics. In turn, one of the most common causes of vertigo is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), accounting for a quarter of all patients with dizziness and vertigo. Reviewing the value of the positional manoeuvres available is relevant, particularly in the light of the efficient treatments.

Abstract. Two sets of experiments have examined the vestibulo-ocular response (VOR) to repeated sinusoidal rotation (A) in the dark and (B) after attempting visual tracking of a mirror-reversed image of the visual surround In both A and B a horizontal sinusoidal rotational stimulus of 1/6 Hz and 60°/sec angular velocity amplitude was employed, specifically chosen to lie within the.

Janine L. Johnston, Pierre M. Daye, Glen T. Thomson, Inaccurate Saccades and Enhanced Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Suppression during Combined Eye–Head Movements in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain: Possible Implications for Cervical Vertigo, Frontiers in.

Three topics related to Vestibulo-Ocular Reflexes will be considered in this chapter: (1) The function of eye movements induced by the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Arc. (2) The pattern of eye movements induced by various parts of the vestibular apparatus.

(3) The central pathways which carry activity responsible for these deviations. This paper presents a bilateral model for the horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR) in the dark based on realistic physiological mechanisms.

It is shown that by assigning proper non-linear neural computations at the premotor level, the model is capable of replicating target-distance dependent VOR responses that are in agreement with.

Human nervous system - Human nervous system - Reflex actions: Of the many kinds of neural activity, there is one simple kind in which a stimulus leads to an immediate action. This is reflex activity. The word reflex (from Latin reflexus, “reflection”) was introduced into biology by a 19th-century English neurologist, Marshall Hall, who fashioned the word because he thought of the muscles.

Lorente de No R () Vestibulo-ocular reflex arc, Arch. Neurol. Psychiat. 30, – Google Scholar McCrea RA, Yoshida K, Berthoz A and Baker R () Eye movement related activity and morphology of second order vestibular neurons terminating in the.

Introduction The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) produces smooth compensatory eye movement to stabilize gaze against head rotation (Vilis and Tweed ). When vergence is minimal, the VOR response is conjugate, i.e., the two eyes move in the same direction and at the same speed.The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is a reflex acting to stabilize gaze during head movement, with eye movement due to activation of the vestibular reflex acts to stabilize images on the retinas of the eye during head movement, holding gaze is held steadily on a location, by producing eye movements in the direction opposite to head movement.

[citation needed] For example, when the. The mal de debarquement syndrome (MdDS), a continuous feeling of swaying, rocking, and/or bobbing, generally follows travel on the sea. The associated symptoms cause considerable distress. The underlying neural mechanisms are unknown, and to date there have been no effective treatments for this condition.

Results in monkeys and humans suggested that MdDS was caused by .